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News Roundup

Georgia’s Shrinking Racial Vaccine Gap

Your AM Rundown: Plus, Keisha Lance Bottoms' a new job, our interview with Stacey Abrams, and more.

Keisha Lance Bottoms talking
Former Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announced plans this week to join CNN as a political commentator. (Paras Griffin/Getty Images)

Top of the morning! Welcome to Your AM Rundown, where you’ll get updates on local news to start the day. In 400 words or less, we will bring you up to speed on both top stories and other developments you might’ve missed.

Here’s what to know:

  • Georgia gubernatorial candidate, Stacey Abrams, has big plans for the state. Taking time from the campaign trail, Abrams spoke to our editor-at-large, Jewel Wicker, about expanding Medicaid, criminal justice reform and other issues facing Black voters. Read the full interview here.
  • Speaking of politics, we now know what former Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms is going to do next: television. Bottoms made the announcement via Twitter, which explained that she is joining CNN as a political commentator. 
  • The state’s racial gap in COVID-19 vaccinations is getting smaller. The rate of Black Georgians who have received at least one vaccine shot is up to 52.4% compared to whites at 53%. For perspective, the state average is 62%. In South DeKalb, one nurse is doing her part to bridge the gap.
  • MARTA gave an update on plans for the Campbellton Road corridor project in Southwest Atlanta. After collecting feedback over the summer of 2021, MARTA recommended adding Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) over Light Rail Transit (LRT). Here is the latest info on the proposed development and next steps.
  • Remember the Hands-Free Driving Act? You know, the one that banned cell phone use while driving? The legislation went into effect in 2018, but recently some state lawmakers came forward with SB 356, which would allow drivers to hold or cradle their phones when the car is at a complete stop.

ICYMI: After last week’s bomb threats, professors at HBCUs nationwide are grappling with the past and present dangers to Black education. Capital B Atlanta’s Kenya Hunter reports.